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A church was later built on the site of the temple during the Byzantine period.(Archaeologists are re-excavating the entrance area to Caesarea as part of a large renovation to make it into a much larger attraction, including the restoration of its 2,000-year-old synagogue.) Ten years of archaeology at Tel Gezer wrapped up in 2017. The Merneptah destruction affirms the inscription on the Merneptah in the Cairo Museum, which states: “Gezer has been captured; Yano’am is made non-existent.The existence of this cultic center was first suggested by the discovery of a mask of the Roman god Pan in 2015. The mosaics date to the fourth and fifth centuries.Mosaic inscriptions found in the remains of churches excavated at the site of Byzantine villages in the Galilee give new evidence for the spread of Christianity in the region after the religion’s formal adoption by the Byzantine Empire in A. One includes the mention of a woman who was a donor to the church construction—clear evidence for the prominent role of women in the history of the early church.Jesus is recorded visiting Solomon’s portico during the Feast of Dedication (Hanukkah) in John , and the early church used it as a meeting place (Acts , ).

Recent excavations at Caesarea Maritima found the base of an altar that stood near the entrance of a temple dedicated to Augustus Caesar that was built by King Herod.This year, a team led by archaeologist Mordechai Aviam of Kinneret College discovered remains of a Roman-era bathhouse at el-Araj, much closer to the shore.Neither site is convincingly identified as Bethsaida at this point; other archaeologists have weighed in to support each side.In the remains of one pot, they found a scrap of rolled papyrus but with no writing on it.The archaeologists also found 1950s-era pickaxes in the back of the cave, indicating it had been looted many years ago.

Recent excavations at Caesarea Maritima found the base of an altar that stood near the entrance of a temple dedicated to Augustus Caesar that was built by King Herod.

This year, a team led by archaeologist Mordechai Aviam of Kinneret College discovered remains of a Roman-era bathhouse at el-Araj, much closer to the shore.

Neither site is convincingly identified as Bethsaida at this point; other archaeologists have weighed in to support each side.

In the remains of one pot, they found a scrap of rolled papyrus but with no writing on it.

The archaeologists also found 1950s-era pickaxes in the back of the cave, indicating it had been looted many years ago.

Solomon’s portico, the double colonnade that surrounded the temple built by Herod, came into a little sharper focus this year with the discovery of an ornamental capital from one of the tops of the columns.