Accomodating children with special dietary

27-Oct-2017 12:04

Situation: A child has a health condition that does not meet the definition of "disability" set forth in the legislation and regulations.For example, the child is overweight (but not “morbidly" so), or the child has elevated blood cholesterol.Nutrition Services in Cases of Food Allergies When accommodating a child’s food allergy, no food item offered to the child may contain traces of substances that may trigger an allergic reaction.See more guidance about managing food allergies in schools in According to the ADA, physical or mental impairments do not need to be life threatening to constitute a disability.Is the school obligated to accommodate the special dietary needs of this child?Situation: A child's parents have requested that the school prepare a strict vegetarian diet for their child based on a statement from a health food store "nutrition advisor" who is not a licensed physician. Situation: Some schools purchase items from nationally recognized fast-food chains and sell these items on an "a la carte" basis.Situation: A child has a life threatening allergy which causes an anaphylactic reaction to peanuts.

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If your child’s IEP includes a nutrition component, the school is required to offer special meals, at no additional cost, if your child’s disability restricts her diet.To what lengths must the food service go to accommodate the child?Is it sufficient for the school food service to merely avoid obvious foods, such as peanut butter, or must school food service staff research every ingredient and additive in processed foods or regularly post all of the ingredients used in recipes?The guidance addresses IDEA 2004 and the ADA and makes it clear that if a student has a documented disability that restricts their diet, the school food service department must make the substitutions in lunches and afterschool snacks for students.If a meal modification for a child’s disability can be made within the Program meal pattern, a medical statement is not necessary.

If your child’s IEP includes a nutrition component, the school is required to offer special meals, at no additional cost, if your child’s disability restricts her diet.To what lengths must the food service go to accommodate the child?Is it sufficient for the school food service to merely avoid obvious foods, such as peanut butter, or must school food service staff research every ingredient and additive in processed foods or regularly post all of the ingredients used in recipes?The guidance addresses IDEA 2004 and the ADA and makes it clear that if a student has a documented disability that restricts their diet, the school food service department must make the substitutions in lunches and afterschool snacks for students.If a meal modification for a child’s disability can be made within the Program meal pattern, a medical statement is not necessary.If your child has “life threatening” food allergies that are part of his disability you should read School plans should establish priorities for reducing the risk of exposure to food allergens and establish practices for responding to food allergies.