Abusive and intimidating behavior in business

25-Dec-2017 02:42

More information on this topic is available in the OSH Answers document OH&S Legislation - Due Diligence.This provision would include protecting employees from a known risk of workplace violence.Workplace violence is not limited to incidents that occur within a traditional workplace.Work-related violence can occur at off-site business-related functions (conferences, trade shows), at social events related to work, in clients' homes or away from work but resulting from work (a threatening telephone call to your home from a client).Jurisdictions in Canada that have specific workplace violence prevention regulations include Alberta, British Columbia, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, Nova Scotia, Newfoundland and Labrador, Prince Edward Island, Northwest Territories, and Nunavut as well as Canadian federally regulated workplaces (for those organizations that fall under the Canada Labour Code, Part II).Quebec has legislation regarding "psychological harassment", which may include forms of workplace violence.

abusive and intimidating behavior in business-28abusive and intimidating behavior in business-27abusive and intimidating behavior in business-62abusive and intimidating behavior in business-55

It is the repetition that generates the harassment.Many jurisdictions also have working alone regulations, which may have some implications for workplace violence prevention. For a list of where violence is specifically referenced in the legislation for Canadian jurisdictions see Violence in the Workplace.(please note: viewing the list is free, you will require a subscription to see the actual legislation). Contact your local authorities to find out more about the specific laws applicable to violence in your jurisdiction.It is especially useful to individuals involved in the development and implementation of workplace violence prevention programs.We also have created the following three e-learning courses based on the best selling pocket guide: Although every effort is made to ensure the accuracy, currency and completeness of the information, CCOHS does not guarantee, warrant, represent or undertake that the information provided is correct, accurate or current.

It is the repetition that generates the harassment.

Many jurisdictions also have working alone regulations, which may have some implications for workplace violence prevention. For a list of where violence is specifically referenced in the legislation for Canadian jurisdictions see Violence in the Workplace.

(please note: viewing the list is free, you will require a subscription to see the actual legislation). Contact your local authorities to find out more about the specific laws applicable to violence in your jurisdiction.

It is especially useful to individuals involved in the development and implementation of workplace violence prevention programs.

We also have created the following three e-learning courses based on the best selling pocket guide: Although every effort is made to ensure the accuracy, currency and completeness of the information, CCOHS does not guarantee, warrant, represent or undertake that the information provided is correct, accurate or current.

Most people think of violence as a physical assault.